Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. captured the movement's goal during his famous "How Long, Not Long" speech: "The end we seek is a society at peace with itself, a society that can live with its conscience."


Family Life

Amidst the turmoil of the turbulent 1960s, the African-American Civil Rights Movement sought to put an end to racial segregation. Often through non-violent demonstrations, activists were able to create awareness, gain support, and nurture a social dialogue that produced results. Fifty years ago, in March 1965, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. captured the movement's goal during his famous "How Long, Not Long" speech: "The end we seek is a society at peace with itself, a society that can live with its conscience."

 

 

"Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to one hope when you were called; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all" (Ephesians 4:3-6, NIV).